"The objections to religion are of two sorts - intellectual and moral. The intellectual objection is that there is no reason to suppose any religion true; the moral objection is that religious precepts date from a time when men were more cruel than they are and therefore tend to perpetuate inhumanities which the moral conscience of the age would otherwise outgrow."

- Bertrand Russell

Éire. July 2013. CF

Sugar Loaf, Éire. July 2013. CF

(Soon…)

For you dear, I was born
For you I was raised up
For you I’ve lived and for you I will die
For you I am dying now
You were my mad little lover
In a world where everybody fucks everybody else over
You who are so far from me
Far from me
So far from me
Way across some cold neurotic sea
Far from me

I would talk to you of all matter of things
With a smile you would reply
Then the sun would leave your pretty face
And you’d retreat from the front of your eyes
I keep hearing that you’re doing best
I hope your heart beats happy in your infant breast
You are so far from me
Far from me
Far from me

There is no knowledge but i know it
There’s nothing to learn from that vacant voice
That sails to me across the line
From the ridiculous to the sublime
It’s good to hear you’re doing so well
But really can’t you find somebody else that you can ring and tell
Did you ever
Care for me?
Were you ever
There for me?
So far from me

You told me you’d stick by me
Through the thick and through the thin
Those were your very words
My fair-weather friend
You were my brave-hearted lover
At the first taste of trouble went running back to mother
So far from me
Far from me
Suspended in your bleak and fishless sea
Far from me
Far from me

African Proverb
“When deeds speak, words are nothing”
Jorge Louis Borges
“You have wakened not out of sleep, but into a prior dream, and that dream lies within another, and so on, to infinity, which is the number of grains of sand. The path that you are to take is endless, and you will die before you have truly awakened.”

Chungking Express (Wong Kar-wai, 1994)

likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava

"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective.

His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.

DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”

I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava

1. Man in Window

2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York

3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat

4. Woman on Train

5. Window and Stove

6. Man with Portfolio

7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 

8. Kids God Bless

9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs

10. Hallway